Are your school’s walls uninspiring?

woodford county physics feature wall

Research on the effects of learning environments on pupil’s show that school buildings lay the foundations for pupils’ learning and for their experience in school. (DfES 2003).

 

The impact of bespoke Wall Art

How well school buildings are designed and maintained and the learning environments within them have a strong impact on pupils’ and teachers’ wellbeing and happiness.

Promote Your School use their bespoke Wall Art designs to stimulate a learning environment in schools, nurseries, colleges and universities to engage students, encourage children’s natural curiosity and inspire pupils and staff.

 

Improving Learning Outcomes

Inspiring environments improve learning outcomes. A school environment can enrich the curriculum and opportunities that you provide your students with. Subject zoned corridor, stairwell and sports hall wraps can tune students minds into the lessons ahead and encourage them to approach each session with the attitude towards their learning that you are looking for. They can also help with way-finding as students navigate the building and help children who need that additional preparation time to enter lessons ready to learn.

 

Wall Art creates opportunities for learning by using visual resources to encourage engagement in subject knowledge, aid understanding and create awe and wonder moments for the students”, says Wall Art’s Co-Founder Chris Harris. “Themed areas can widen children’s understanding of the world around them and effectively raise pupil’s ambitions through carefully chosen, aspirational wording and images”.

 

The aesthetic features of a school can foster a strong sense of belonging that, in turn, can generate an enthusiasm for learning (Jarman et al., 2004). “Communal areas such as your hall, with Wall Art about values, mottos and houses, for example, can create a feeling of unity, teamwork and collaboration which brings the school community together in a positive way”, says Chris.

 

Improving well-being

Wall Art also has a positive impact on pupil and staff well-being. Philipp et al, 1999a found that environments with high aesthetic quality provide pleasurable places to be for contemplation, personal reflection, enjoyment, relaxation and replenishing the soul. “They also help to encourage a healthy personal outlook”, explains Chris’ Co-founder, Lisa Savage, “while improving the surrounding environment will benefit the mental well-being of students and staff alike.

Calming break out zones such as canteens and break time areas can provide a space to release the tensions and relax between lessons, energising students to engage positively with their next session.

 

Promoting your school and engaging visitors

Wall Art on your school’s exterior walls and fencing gives a window into life at your school – it also makes your school an inviting place to visit! We all know first impressions and the way you present yourselves count. Well-designed welcome walls in your reception area will give a friendly first impression and make your visitors feel comfortable and at ease.

 

A school environment has the power to calm and relax, intrigue and excite – the possibilities of Wall Art are huge and can be varied in aim from area to area.

 

This article was recently published in Independent Education Today, Issue 102, pages 32-33. 

 

If you would like to discuss how we can help you to improve your learning environment using Wall Art, please contact Lisa Savage on lisa.savage@promoteyourschool.co.uk or 020 7404 3400.

 

Department for Education and Skills (February 2003), “Building schools for the future: consultation on a new approach to capital investment” available at

Jarman, D., Webb, L. and Chan, T.C. (2004), “A beautiful school is a caring school”, School Business Affairs.

Philipp, R., Pond, K., Rees, G., and Bartram, J. (1999a). The association of tourist health with aesthetic quality and environmental values. pp.195- 199. In: Mobility & Health: From Hominid Migration To Mass Tourism. Proceedings of European Conference on Travel Medicine, Venice, 25-27 March 1998. pub. WHO Collaborating Centre for Tourist Health and Travel Medicine, and Regione Veneto; 381pp.